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  #41  
Old 13th July 2017, 09:09 PM
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More - Fairfax obit:


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His songs resonated among many South Africans, particularly during the era of white minority rule that ended in 1994. Phiri "breathed consciousness and agitated thoughts of freedom through his music", said the ruling African National Congress party, which was the main movement against apartheid until it took power in the country's first all-race elections.

Stimela's best-known albums include the 1980s records Fire, Passion and Ecstasy and Look, Listen and Decide. Phiri also contributed as a guitarist to Simon's 1986 Graceland, which evolved from Simon's interest in South African music.

Raymond Chikapa Enock Phiri was born on March 23, 1947, in what is now the eastern South African province of Mpumalanga, and grew up near Nelspruit. He was 4 when his father died, and Phiri's mother remarried, to a troubadour from Malawi. Phiri soon took up the guitar.

Phiri said Graceland brought world attention to South Africa, but he told the Johannesburg Sunday Times in 2011 there was "bad blood" between him and Simon.

"He never gave me credit on the album for the songs I wrote, and financially we hardly got any royalties," he said. "But maybe I wouldn't have been able to handle all that wealth. I sleep at night, I have my sanity and I enjoy living. The big rock 'n' roll machine did not munch me."
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  #42  
Old 14th July 2017, 04:42 AM
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Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo

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Liu Xiaobo, Nobel Peace Prize laureate imprisoned in China, dies at 61
By Harrison Smith
July 13 at 9:53 AM
In the days after the Chinese writer and dissident Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, on Oct. 8, 2010, his country cut off trade talks with Norway, home of the Nobel committee, and placed his wife under house arrest. In apparent protest of the award, a group of Chinese business and cultural leaders established an alternative to the Nobel, the Confucius Peace Prize, and later honored such human rights renegades as Vladi*mir Putin, Fidel Castro and Robert Mugabe.
Mr. Liu, who died July 13 at age 61, received the Nobel for what the award committee called his “long and nonviolent struggle for fundamental human rights.” It was that very struggle, from his hunger strike at Beijing’s Tiananmen Square to his insistent calls to end to one-party rule, that also made him a marked man in China.
He was in the midst of an 11-year prison sentence when he won the prize. It provoked a man much of the world regarded as a distinguished activist and whose own leaders considered a dangerous subversive.
Foreign news reports about the Nobel honor were blacked out in China, where authorities called the award a “desecration” of the prize. Text messages that included his name went unreceived, stymied by state-run cellular networks, and the news was squelched online by the censorship apparatus known as the “Great Firewall.”
At the Nobel ceremony in Oslo, Mr. Liu was represented by an empty chair. Not since the 1935 prize, when German pacifist Carl von Ossietzky was being held at a concentration camp by the Nazis, had a laureate or a family member been unable to accept the honor in person. Ossietzky died at a Nazi hospital in 1938.
Mr. Liu spent much of the last three decades in forced confinement — at home, at labor camps or in prison. And his final months, after being diagnosed with late-stage liver cancer in May and granted medical parole, drew international calls for his release.
His death, at a hospital in the northeastern city of Shenyang, was confirmed by a statement from the Chinese government, and it made Mr. Liu the latest in a string of Chinese dissidents whose incarceration ended in serious illness or fatality. A photograph posted on July 5 on Twitter by the dissident writer Ye Du showed an emaciated Mr. Liu at the hospital with his wife, Yu Xia, a photographer and poet who had pleaded for better medical care for Mr. Liu.
A pair of American and German doctors who were granted permission to treat Mr. Liu said Sunday that he was strong enough to seek medical treatment abroad. Chinese officials resisted that claim, and rebuffed requests from Germany and the State Department to allow him to leave the country.
The hospital treating Mr. Liu said that he was suffering from respiratory and renal failure, as well as septic shock, and that his family had decided against inserting a breathing tube necessary to keep him alive.
Through it all, Mr. Liu’s plight remained largely invisible at home, where his writings were censored and he was labeled a mere criminal.
‘Looking for real life’
A bespectacled chain-smoker with a stutter, Mr. Liu established himself as a literary and political bombthrower in the mid-1980s, when Chinese society experienced a “cultural fever” under reform-minded Communist Party officials.
Mr. Liu (whose full name is pronounced lee-oh SHEEOW-bwoh) “was the enfant terrible of the late-’80s intellectual scene in Beijing,” said journalist Orville Schell, an acquaintance of Mr. Liu’s who is now a China scholar at the Asia Society in New York. “He was somebody who you invited to a party with some trepidation, because he was bound to offend someone.”
Confucius was “a mediocre talent,” Mr. Liu said; contemporary Chinese writers were even worse. The country’s “Marxism-Leninism,” he wrote in one article, was “not so much a belief system as a tool used by rulers to impose ideological dictatorship.”
Mr. Liu was a visiting scholar at Columbia University when, in April 1989, thousands of students began demonstrating in Tiananmen Square to demand democratic reforms. The assembly marked a turning point for Mr. Liu, who arrived at Tiananmen in May and began protesting alongside the movement’s young leaders.
When the chants began to die down and soldiers started trying to clear the square, Mr. Liu and three friends — including Hou Dejian, a popular rock singer from Taiwan — erected a tent alongside the 10-story Monument to the People’s Heroes, and began a 72-hour hunger strike.
“We are not in search of death; we are looking for real life,” the strikers declared in a statement. “We want to show that democracy practiced by the people by peaceful means is strong and tenacious. We want to break the undemocratic order maintained by bayonets and by lies.”
Two nights later, military units launched a full-scale assault on the square, firing their rifles and driving armored vehicles into crowds that lined the surrounding streets. Mr. Liu and his fellow hunger-strikers, fearing a bloodbath in the square, acted as negotiators between military forces and the remaining demonstrators. At dawn on June 4, the group successfully persuaded the students to leave.
Mr. Liu’s actions — at one point he grabbed a rifle from a demonstrator and smashed it on the ground, preventing what he saw as an excuse for the military to “gun everybody down” — were widely credited with saving thousands of lives. Still, at least several hundred civilians were killed in the attacks, details of which were suppressed by the Chinese government.
“From the moment I walked out of the square, my heart has been heavy,” Mr. Liu said in “The Gate of Heavenly Peace,” a 1995 documentary that took its name from the English translation of Tiananmen. “I’ve never gotten over this.”
While biking on June 6, amid a government crackdown that led other prominent demonstrators to go into hiding, Mr. Liu was captured by Chinese officers. He later recalled the event in a poem, “Experiencing Death”:
Deep in the night, empty road I’m biking home I stop at a cigarette stand A car follows me, crashes over my bicycle some enormous brutes seize me
I’m handcuffed eyes covered mouth gagged
thrown into a prison van heading nowhere

He was imprisoned for 21 months, branded a “black hand” and an “evil mastermind,” and forbidden from publishing in China — a dictate that he subverted through pseudonyms and by penning articles for overseas publications.
Mr. Liu published more than 1,000 essays, by his count, and called for reform, not revolution. Yet he remained under state surveillance, and in 1996 was sentenced to three years of forced labor for drafting a declaration that called for reconciliation with Taiwan, freedom for Tibet and the impeachment of President Jiang Zemin.
Instead of leaving the country, Mr. Liu chose to remain in China, a decision that “was the path of destruction for his life” but that enabled him to remain an effective critic of the state, Schell said. His work culminated in Charter 08, a sweeping pro-democracy manifesto that landed him in prison for the last time.
Published online in 2008, the document was modeled in part on Charter 77, an anti-Communist tract that Czech dissidents such as Vaclav Havel, a friend of Mr. Liu’s, had drafted decades earlier. Mr. Liu was among the leading drafters and first signers of Charter 08, which called for “the democratization of Chinese politics” through the establishment of a new constitution, greater freedom of expression, an independent judiciary and an end to one-party rule.
The document drew unexpectedly wide-ranging support, receiving 10,000 signatures from farmers, lawyers, philosophers and street vendors until it was pulled off the Internet by Chinese censors. “Probably the most worrying thing to the authorities was the broad coalition of people who decided to put their name on it,” Nicholas Bequelin, then an Asia researcher at Human Rights Watch, told Britain’s Guardian newspaper in 2009. “It was the organization [that concerned them]; it was across different social groups and across the country. That’s really one of the red lines for the party.”
Mr. Liu was captured by police shortly before the document’s release and confined to a windowless room north of Beijing. His final public statement was in court, days before he was found guilty of “inciting subversion of state power” on Christmas Day 2009.
“I firmly believe that China’s political progress will never stop, and I’m full of optimistic expectations of freedom coming to China in the future, because no force can block the human desire for freedom,” he said in the statement. Titled “I Have No Enemies,” it was later read at his Nobel ceremony.
The statement included extended remarks about his wife, whose love he described as his “most fortunate experience” in 20 years. “Even if I were crushed into powder,” he said, “I would still use my ashes to embrace you.”
Childhood under Mao
Mr. Liu was born in the northeastern city of Changchun on Dec. 28, 1955, and came of age during the worst years of the Cultural Revolution. In Mao Zedong’s bid to reassert his authority and revive revolutionary zeal, intellectuals and alleged dissidents were “reeducated” through forced labor, and millions of urban children were sent out of school and “down to the countryside,” to work at farms and rural communities. Thousands of professionals were attacked and killed.
With his father, a professor of Chinese literature, Mr. Liu worked for a time in Inner Mongolia. He returned to Changchun and graduated from Jilin University in 1982, part of the first cohort to return to college after Mao’s death in 1976. He received a master’s degree in Chinese literature at Beijing Normal University in 1984, and received his doctorate there four years later.
Mr. Liu married Liu Xia at a labor camp in 1996, although their marriage was not officially recognized for another two years. In 2012, she told the Associated Press she was allowed to visit Mr. Liu in prison once a month, but was otherwise permitted to leave her apartment only to buy groceries and see her parents.
A previous marriage, to Tao Li, ended in divorce during Mr. Liu’s first prison sentence. In addition to his wife, survivors include a son from his first marriage, Liu Tao.
Mr. Liu focused increasingly on his writing and poetry in later years, and from 2003 to 2007 served as president of the Independent Chinese PEN Center. Some of his work was translated into English and published in the 2012 collections “No Enemies, No Hatred” and “June Fourth Elegies.”
The latter featured poems that Mr. Liu wrote each year in commemoration of the Tiananmen Square attacks. The writing, he said, was a means of bearing witness to a tragedy that had been excised from the country’s official histories.
He wrote in one poem:
The day
seems more and more distant,
and yet for me it
remains a needle inside my body
remains a crowd of Mothers who’ve lost their children.
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Last edited by The Irreverent Mr Black; 14th July 2017 at 04:47 AM. Reason: formatting
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  #43  
Old 16th July 2017, 09:08 AM
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Maryam Mirzakhani, first woman to win maths' Fields Medal



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Maryam Mirzakhani, the first woman to receive the prestigious Fields Medal for mathematics, has died in the US.
The 40-year-old Iranian, a professor at Stanford University, had breast cancer which had spread to her bones.
Nicknamed the "Nobel Prize for Mathematics", the Fields Medal is only awarded every four years to between two and four mathematicians under 40.
It was given to Prof Mirzakhani in 2014 for her work on complex geometry and dynamical sy
stems.
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  #44  
Old 17th July 2017, 09:24 AM
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Living Dead director George A Romero dies at 77

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The American-born filmmaker George A Romero, who created the genre-defining Living Dead movie franchise, has died at the age of 77, his family have said.
Romero died in his sleep on Sunday after a " brief but aggressive battle" with lung cancer, his manager told Variety.
Romero co-wrote and directed the film that started the zombie series - Night of the Living Dead - in 1968.
For geeks like me, this is a notable passing. 'Night', 'Dawn' and 'Day', what a trilogy!
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  #45  
Old 17th July 2017, 09:44 AM
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LA Times George Romero obituary
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  #46  
Old 17th July 2017, 10:48 AM
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His view on "The Walking Dead" is the same as mine. The walking dud, more like it.
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  #47  
Old 17th July 2017, 07:10 PM
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stylofone said View Post
Living Dead director George A Romero dies at 77

Quote:
The American-born filmmaker George A Romero, who created the genre-defining Living Dead movie franchise, has died at the age of 77, his family have said.
Romero died in his sleep on Sunday after a " brief but aggressive battle" with lung cancer, his manager told Variety.
Romero co-wrote and directed the film that started the zombie series - Night of the Living Dead - in 1968.
For geeks like me, this is a notable passing. 'Night', 'Dawn' and 'Day', what a trilogy!


Vale, George.
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  #48  
Old 19th July 2017, 03:35 PM
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Vale, George.
Can we have a pic of you AFTER u apply the Zombie make-up??
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  #49  
Old 22nd July 2017, 11:39 AM
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Songwriter Geoff Mack, 94, now adds one last destination to the everywheres he's been.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoff_Mack

Geoff Mack OAM

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Albert Geoffrey McElhinney OAM (20 December 1922 – 21 July 2017), better known as Geoff Mack, was a country singer-songwriter. As a songwriter, he wrote "I've Been Everywhere" which was an Australian hit for Lucky Starr in April 1962 and became popular in North America when adapted for Hank Snow in November. More than 130 cover versions have been recorded.

Biography

Albert Geoffrey McElhinney, later known as Geoff Mack, was born on 20 December 1922 in Surrey Hills, a suburb of Melbourne. His father was William Arthur Henry McElhinney and his mother was Ethel Mary (nee Park).

Mack's musical career was established during World War II. Albert Geoffrey McElhinney enlisted on 4 June 1942 in the RAAF, and was trained as an aircraft mechanic; he was discharged on 7 January 1946 with the rank of corporal from 62 ACW (Airfield Construct Wing). In 1944 whilst serving in Borneo, his ability to play the guitar and sing was noticed, and he was seconded to entertain the troops with visiting guest stars. In May 1946, Mack was an ex-serviceman performer on a theatre concert, who "was responsible for most of the laughs with his vocal gymnastics, his number, 'In Der Fuhrer's Face', being a gem of its kind, which had the audience in hysterics."

At the end of the war, Mack went to Japan with the Occupation Forces to perform, and was appointed to Radio WLKS as the voice of the British Commonwealth Occupation Forces. In August 1950, he returned to Australia after performing for British, American, French, German, and Japanese audiences, including his rendition of "Waltzing Matilda".

His 1959 song, "I've Been Everywhere", became a hit in Australia in 1962 with the release of a cover version by Lucky Starr. It later reached the top of the song charts in the USA, Germany, and Japan. The song has now been recorded in 131 different versions, notably on Johnny Cash's 1996 album Unchained. In 2005, the song was used in The Simpsons' episode "Mobile Homer" when Homer sang part of the American version to fellow RV owners in his yard.

Honours

Mack was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in Nashville, Tennessee in 1963, into the Hands of Fame at Tamworth NSW in 1978, and he received the Tamworth Song Writer's Association Song Maker Award in 1997.

He was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 2005 for his service to country music, and his support of community and senior citizens' groups.

In 2013, Mack was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Golden Guitar by Country Music Association of Australia at their annual awards ceremony in Tamworth.

Geoff Mack

Birth name: Albert Geoffrey McElhinney

Born
20 December 1922z; Surrey Hills, Victoria, Australia

Died: 21 July 2017 (aged 94), Benowa, Gold Coast, Australia

Genresz: Country

Occupation(s: Singer, songwriter, aircraft mechanic

Instruments: Vocals, guitar

Years active: 1944–2017

Website: www.geoffmack.250x.com

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Last edited by The Irreverent Mr Black; 22nd July 2017 at 11:42 AM. Reason: format probs
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  #50  
Old 22nd July 2017, 09:28 PM
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Maralinga victim Yami Lester, so long and thank you.

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Yami Lester, who was left blind by the Maralinga atomic tests and went on to become a tireless campaigner for Aboriginal rights, has died aged 75.

Mr Lester, who died in Alice Springs on Friday night, was left blind as a young adolescent from the nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s, which he called the "black mist".

"Mr Lester was a key Aboriginal leader who embraced the challenge of bridging two worlds," NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner said on Saturday.

"He never let his blindness hold him back; he was sharp as a tack in negotiating at the highest levels of business and government."

He joined the Aboriginal Advancement League in Adelaide, fighting to gain recognition for the British atomic tests in South Australia, and an acknowledgement for the 1800 Aboriginal people affected.

His work led to the McClelland Royal Commission in 1984-85, which resulted in group compensation for the Maralinga Tjarutja people and long-term clean-up operations to restore the land.

Mr Lester, who has an Order of Australia, was also central to the work of the Pitjantjatjara Council that led to the grant of freehold title to traditional owners in South Australia.

His warmth, kindness, generosity and resolve inspired so many Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, and as Tjamu (grandfather) and Katja (great-grandfather) "he will be forever remembered by his loved ones, his extended family, community and by so many", a statement from his family said.
NB: Permission was granted for the use of Yami's name, voice and images by his immediate family.
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