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Old 21st September 2017, 08:51 AM
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Default Embedded Memory - Done The Ancient Way

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Received opinion is that this method of loci, as the technique is also known, dates to before Simonides of Ceos (c556-468 BCE), who is often credited as the inventor. However there is ample circumstantial evidence that indigenous cultures the world over have been using it for far longer than that. There is a continuous record dating back at least 40,000 years for Australian Aboriginal cultures. Their songlines, along with Native American pilgrimage trails, Pacific Islanders’ ceremonial roads and the ceque system of the Inca at Cusco all exhibit exactly the same pattern as the memory palaces described by Cicero. At each sacred location along these paths, elders would sing, dance or tell a story, all making the information associated with the location more memorable.

The memory skills of indigenous elders exceed anything reported for the ancient Greeks. Research with the Native American Navajo people, for example, shows that they memorise a classification of more than 700 insects along with identification, habitats and behaviour. And that’s just insects. A fully initiated indigenous elder would be able to relate stories equivalent to a field guide for all the birds, mammals, reptiles, fish and hundreds of insects within their environment.

Another study shows that the Hanunoo people of the Philippines were able to identify 1,625 plants, many of which were unknown to Western science at the time. Add to that knowledge of astronomy, timekeeping, navigation, legal and ethical guidelines, weather and seasons, complex genealogies and belief systems, and you have a vast encyclopaedia stored in an interwoven memorised web: a web that is tied to a real or imagined memory palace.

Cultures without writing are referred to as ‘non-literate’, but their identity should not be associated with what they don’t do, but rather with what they do from necessity when there is no writing to record their knowledge. Cultures without writing employ the most intriguing range of memory technologies often linked under the academic term ‘primary orality’, including song, dance, rhyme and rhythm, and story and mythology. Physical memory devices, though, are less often included in this list. The most universal of these is the landscape itself.

Australian Aboriginal memory palaces are spread across the land, structured by sung pathways referred to as songlines. The songlines of the Yanyuwa people from Carpentaria in Australia’s far north have been recorded over 800 kilometres. A songline is a sequence of locations, that might, for example, include the rocks that provide the best materials for tools, to a significant tree or a waterhole. They are far more than a navigation aid. At each location, a song or story, dance or ceremony is performed that will always be associated with that particular location, physically and in memory. A songline, then, provides a table of contents to the entire knowledge system, one that can be traversed in memory as well as physically.
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Old 21st September 2017, 07:12 PM
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Default Re: Embedded Memory - Done The Ancient Way

Many years ago, I worked in the shearing sheds, and I became friends with a couple of Maori blokes.

These blokes were from the centre of North Island, and were of the Ngati Tuwharetoa, and steeped in the still-living culture of that tribe. I had the great privilege of being leant a tome, the collected written version of their traditionally oral history, stretching back to the original journey to Aoteroa from Hawaiki (sp?).

The tale of the navigation speaks of precisely this method. A song would tell the tale of the journey in effectively real-time, as I understand it, a sort of information-dense reiteration of "and if you look to your left, you will see the great big fucking rock that nearly wrecked Bob's canoe". The songs, from what I understand, would last the entire length of a journey, telling of hazards and tricks to avoid them, and what food was available in what season, and all that.

Up until this point, I had pretty much fuck-all knowledge of anything regarding First Nations people and cultures, and this blew my fucking mind. Later, I learned that this way to navigate, to store and propagate knowledge of locales and seasons and all of that seems to be pretty much ubiquitous across the globe.

I can barely remember the lyrics to Black Hole Sun.
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