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Old 16th March 2017, 01:41 PM
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Default Secular Calendar

Calendars have religious origins.

Campaign and legislate a new calendar system that is based on the geological age of our Earth, or even the universe. It is secular.

Today, it would be like XX/XX/4.54 x 10^9.

It is worthwhile altering systems representing days and months.

Discuss.
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Old 16th March 2017, 02:15 PM
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Default Re: Secular Calendar

The problem with that is, tomorrow would then be (XX/XX/4.54 x 10^9)+1, quite awkward to express
And anyway, I'm not sure about the religious origin?
Calendars are almost inevitable on our world. Days, seasons, tides all exist outside of religion. If religion formalised some order, then at least it had some use.
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Old 16th March 2017, 04:19 PM
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Default Re: Secular Calendar

What we need is a ten day week, with a six day weekend.
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Old 16th March 2017, 04:25 PM
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Default Re: Secular Calendar

Quote:
Svadifari said View Post
The problem with that is, tomorrow would then be (XX/XX/4.54 x 10^9)+1, quite awkward to express
And anyway, I'm not sure about the religious origin?
Calendars are almost inevitable on our world. Days, seasons, tides all exist outside of religion. If religion formalised some order, then at least it had some use.
Oh, I dunno...

If the beginning point depends on current generally-accepted birthdate of the universe or planet, then "zero" is going to shift under the influence of scientific discovery, providing a counter-influence on that darned Doomsday Clock.
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Old 17th March 2017, 04:21 PM
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Default Re: Secular Calendar

as I type it's Stardate 94810.87.
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Old 17th March 2017, 06:05 PM
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Default Re: Secular Calendar

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wearestardust said View Post
as I type it's Stardate 94810.87.
Stardates might be okay, as long as they're Picardist and not Shatnerite ones.
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Old 21st March 2017, 12:49 PM
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Default Re: Secular Calendar

Being a touch more serious, most calendars historically have not been terribly well aligned to the earth's actual orbit and having a calendar that does so with some accuracy is relatively recent - and because of the utter stupidity of the Catholic church in its approach to refining refinements of Roman calendars which arguably were about organising business and records as much as religion.

The point being, it's not a case of religious people and their stupid calendars we should be secularist.

The Catholic intervention is interesting, if facepalm-worthy. Julius Caesar had straightened out the previous Roman calendar by fixing it with a formula with fixed numbers of days for most months and leap years. This replaced an earlier calendar with something like 355 days, and it was up to the priests to 'intercalate' additional days - that is, add them at the end of the year, IIRC - to make the year the 'right' length. This both offended Caesar's sense of neatness (sometimes the priests couldn't be bothered) and he was concerned about priests using their powers to shorten or extend the periods in office of elected officials.

The Julian calendar was pretty good but after a number of centuries it still 'drifted' against the astronomical year. This because a concern of the Catholic church because it wanted to ensure it was celebrating Easter on the 'right' date, ie the first Sunday after the first full moon after the northern hemisphere vernal equinox. One might think, because that's mostly related to astronomical events, one doesn't need to worry about Calendar accuracy. But the Church defined the date of the equinox as being fixed in the Calendar (none of this observational malarkey), which requires a more accurate calendar, and so we have the Gregorian calendar after whichever Gregory it was.

Which leads to two more facepalming things.

First, non-Catholic Christian denominations were generally slow to take up the more accurate calendar because, you know, religious stupidity. Most Orthodox denominations still use the Julian calendar, hence their different Easter and Christmas and my Serbian friends buying up for Christmas at the boxing day and afterwards sales.

Secondly - though I may have this wrong - the equinox is not always, every time, invariably, on the same calendar day. So the Gregorian calendar has a more accurate length of year (on average), but it's still not quite accurate with regard to the equinox.
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Last edited by wearestardust; 21st March 2017 at 01:12 PM. Reason: more blather
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Old 21st March 2017, 01:04 PM
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Default Re: Secular Calendar

Subdivision at the Big End, just as the year is divided into months, would enable use of larger meaningful timescales.

If a startpoint of astronomical (or other, large-scale, scientific) significance is to be used, then breaking the date into BigUnit/Year/Month/Day could be sensible, rather than dealing with a Year column larger than four digits.
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