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Old 9th June 2017, 12:15 PM
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Default A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Background:

Alcoholics Anonymous's third tradition states that:

Quote:
The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.
Yet there is significant evidence of harassment of non-religious groups within AA.

Case 1: Toronto

As it was put by an Intergroup representative (Mark C from the Welcome Group) at its meeting on Tuesday, January 31: “There is no policing in AA”.
Ironic, because four self-appointed “AA cops” showed up at a Widening Our Gateway meeting on a Sunday in late November 2011 and, sure enough, they concluded that there was evidence of “tampered steps”. The group was subsequently booted out of the GTA Intergroup.

Larry K, a member of the We Agnostics group, one of the two agnostic groups booted out by the GTAI way back in May 2011, launched a complaint against Intergroup with the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal on September 18, 2014. He claimed that he and the groups, which had their own secular versions of the 12 Steps, were being discriminated against based on religious creed.

The Tribunal indeed views that as a form of discrimination, as stated in its Code:

Quote:
Every person has the right to be free from discriminatory or harassing behaviour that is based on religion or which arises because the person who is the target of the behaviour does not share the same faith. This principle extends to situations where the person who is the target of such behaviour has no religious beliefs whatsoever, including atheists and agnostics who may, in these circumstances, benefit from the protection set out in the Code.
Two hearings were held (October 22, 2015 and January 13, 2016) and the position of the GTAI was as follows, as reported by the Tribunal:

Quote:
The respondent, GTAI, submits that the Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) recovery program follows 12 steps and that these steps involve a belief in God. GTAI submits that evidence indicates that its purpose is to practice the 12 steps and practice a belief in God. In order to be part of GTAI, a group must be prepared to practice the 12 steps and thus the members of the group must have a belief in God… GTAI also submits that it is a bona fide requirement that groups that wish to be part of this intergroup must have a belief in the higher power of God.
The Toronto Area Intergroup believes that a belief in God is a necessary part of being a part of its organization. And as expressed in point 8, it seeks to rely on an exception in the Code which allows “religious organizations” to exclude those who are not like-minded from membership or participation, in this case atheists and agnostics.

You see, the only time you can legitimately ban non-believers, according to the Human Rights Code is if, well, you are a religious organization. That is permitted by Section 18 of the Code where an organization identifies itself as a “special interest organization”(In this case, a religious organisation).

As announced in its Quarterly Report (October 2016), the AA General Service Office was planning to cut off its ties with the Greater Toronto Area Intergroup (GTAI):

Quote:
A motion was made that A.A.W.S, Inc. remove all database directory listings of the Greater Toronto Area Intergroup based on their response to the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal that they are a religious organization. The motion was adopted unanimously by the A.A.W.S. board.
The GSO’s decision to “de-list” the Greater Intergroup came just before two mediation sessions between Larry and the GTAI, held on November 18, 2016 and January 18, 2017. The Tribunal asks every person who files a human rights application (the Applicant) and every person or organization responding to a human rights application (the Respondent(s)) to participate in mediation in order to attempt to reach a settlement, that is, to resolve the issues raised in the application without going to a formal hearing.

And that’s where the GTAI yielded to the GSO and to agnostics in AA. In the settlement document, the Greater Toronto Area Intergroup does a complete about-face and acknowledges that a group can be recognized as a participating group in the GTA Intergroup “regardless of the specific beliefs or practices of the group members or the group as a whole”.

After a battle that lasted almost five years, agnostic groups will once again be listed on the Greater Toronto Area AA meeting list and be recognized as full, participating members of the GTAI. And we can interpret and share our own non-godly versions of the Steps, if and as we wish.

While the GTAI maintains that an AA group needs to “acknowledge” or “adopt” the 12 Steps, 12 Traditions and 12 Concepts of AA, acknowledgement is not a problem. It is simply history. The reading of the secular 12 Steps at Beyond Belief has always been preceded with the statement, “This version is adapted from the original 12 Steps which were first published in 1939 in Chapter 5 of Alcoholic Anonymous.”

In a full concession to we agnostics in AA, and our rights within the fellowship, the report goes on to state:

Quote:
GTA Intergroup acknowledges that the manner in which individual AA members or groups of AA members interpret and apply the Steps and Traditions in their own lives is a matter for those individuals alone.
Those words are the very essence of what the GTAI had to do to achieve a Human Rights Tribunal settlement.

Still, the GTAI fails to understand its own failings and the damage it has done to alcoholics and to the fellowship. One of the paragraphs in its report is particularly bizarre: “It has been, and remains, the GTAI’s position that there has been no discrimination against the complainant, or indeed anyone else, let alone on the prohibited ground of creed”.

The GTAI does however concede that when Larry first went to them to express his concerns, “the response to those concerns was not as constructive as it could have been”.

It had to put aside its religious dogmatism and recognize, if only reluctantly and certainly not wholeheartedly, that the way “individual AA members or groups of AA members interpret and apply the Steps and Traditions in their own lives is a matter for those individuals alone”.

That is AA. Or AA as it was meant to be, before and after the behaviour that the GTAI displayed because a few had the gall to ignore its dogmatic my way or the highway approach to recovery in AA. “All people must necessarily rally to the call of their own particular convictions and we of AA are no exception.” Bill Wilson said that. He was right.

“Members will be allowed to interpret them however they choose,” said Megan Evans-Maxwell, Mr. Knight’s lawyer. “This reconfirms that the only requirement of being an AA member is the desire to be sober.”

Against expectations, the agnostic groups actually grew stronger in their time away from the Intergroup fold. They launched their own website and grew from just two GTA meetings to 12. Over the same span, the number of agnostic AA groups worldwide has grown from 80 to 350. “We learned we don’t need to put up with the dogmatic approach,” said Mr. Knight, a member of the Unitarian church. “It’s unnecessary and unhelpful.”
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Old 9th June 2017, 12:21 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Case 2: Agnostic AA NYC

On September 28, 2010, Gayle S R, a GSO staffer, wrote to the administrator of the Agnostic AA NYC website. In the letter Gayle points out that the website refers to “addicts” as well as alcoholics – a no-no in “old school” AA. Worse, a secular version of the 12 Steps was available on the website.

“So we respectfully request that your group stop calling itself an AA group,” Gayle concluded. The modified 12 Steps, and any reference to addicts, were removed from the website.

You can’t change the Steps, some will argue. If you do, you are not AA. After all, the Steps are copyrighted and the copyright is owned by AA World Services.
Moreover, in 1957 the following bylaw was adopted by AA “the General Service Board asserts the negative right of preventing, so far as it may be within its power so to do, any modification, alteration, or extension of these Twelve Steps, except at the instance of the Fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous in keeping with the Charter of the General Service Conference”.

In keeping with the Charter, it would apparently require a two-thirds vote to amend the Steps.

So, isn’t it pretty obvious that a person or group who rewrites the Steps should be booted out of AA, as was done to the two groups here in Toronto? In spite of the quote about the “General Service Board asserts the negative right”, the answer is “absolutely not”. Nobody is trying to change the AA Steps, as originally published in 1939.

However, groups and individuals have a right to their own version. These adapted versions are not meant to replace the original 12 Steps, but are solely for the use of the group, based upon the conscience of its members, or the individual and her or his conscience and beliefs (or lack of belief).

And the author of the Steps, Bill Wilson, was comfortable with that. He was very, very comfortable with adaptations of the 12 Steps within AA. When told that some Buddhists wanted to start AA groups in Thailand but wished to change the word “God” in the Steps to “good”, Bill wrote:

Quote:
To some of us, the idea of substituting “good” for “God” in the Twelve Steps will seem like a watering down of AA’s message. We must remember that AA’s Steps are suggestions only. A belief in them as they stand is not at all a requirement for membership among us. This liberty has made AA available to thousands who never would have tried at all, had we insisted on the Twelve Steps just as written. (Alcoholics Anonymous Comes of Age, Page 81, 1957)
Let’s further explore three points mentioned in Bill’s remarks.

First, “AA’s Steps are suggestions only”. It says so right on page 59 of the Big Book. The Steps as “suggestions” are copyrighted! Atheists and agnostics like Jim Burwell lobbied hard back in 1939 for this and other changes and Bill appreciated these contributions, crediting them with “widening the gateway” of the fellowship.

So there is a very serious problem when the Greater Toronto Area Intergroup (GTAI) says “a group must be prepared to practice the 12 steps”.

Second, “A belief in them as they stand is not at all a requirement for membership among us”.

“As they stand” is an idiom that means “as they are now” or “as they exist at present”. So you don’t have to believe in the Steps (“them”) as they are now, as they stand, in order to be a member of Alcoholics Anonymous.

Third, AA is available to more people – atheists and agnostics, in particular – because the fellowship does not insist upon the Twelve Steps “just as written”. If God can be “as we understand Him” then surely – surely to god, so to speak – we can interpret the Steps as we wish. It could even be argued that an individual interpretation of the Steps is not only unavoidable but it is, in the end, essential.

An atheist or agnostic can’t really be expected to accept Steps in which “God”, “Him” or “Power” (with a capital P) are mentioned six times. “To thine own self be true” is important to many of us in recovery and in AA.

At least three reasons have been listed as to why individuals and groups should not be excluded from the fellowship of AA for putting together their own versions of the 12 Steps.

But it’s worth repeating: Nobody is trying to change the original AA Steps, as published in 1939. Adapted versions are not meant to replace the original 12 Steps, but are solely for the use of the group, based upon the conscience of its members, or the individual and her or his conscience and beliefs (or lack thereof).

There are no requirements in AA. There are no “musts”. As Bill once put it, talking about Tradition Three, “That means that these two or three alcoholics could try for sobriety in any way they liked. They could disagree with any or all of AA’s principles and still call themselves an AA group”.

But all of this means – the very nature of our fellowship requires – that we quit putting the boots to women and men who have created their own personal interpretations of the 12 Steps based upon an honest individual or group conscience.

The Greater Toronto Area Intergroup got it wrong. And it’s up to the rest of us, including AA World Services, to put things back together and invite “anyone anywhere” with a desire to stop drinking to join together with all of us underneath the AA umbrella.

“This is not the first we’ve gone up against bigotry,” says Larry of We Agnostics. “This has been an ongoing struggle in North America.”
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Old 9th June 2017, 12:27 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Case 3: Indianapolis We Agnostics Group

Beyond Belief and We Agnostics in Toronto were not the first agnostic groups to be de-listed by an area Intergroup. The first was the Indianapolis We Agnostics group. Founded on November 1, 2009, by Joe S, Heather B and Chris W, the group is the first and only agnostic group in Indiana.

In a letter dated November 3, 2010, coincidentally on the group’s first anniversary, signed by both the Indianapolis Intergroup office manager and the chairman, the members of We Agnostics were told that “your group reads a changed version of the Twelve Steps” and “It is the judgement of the Indianapolis Intergroup’s Service Committee that your group has decided it is not an AA group”.

The authors of the letter go on to explain the reason for their delisting. “Early in the Big Book our founders made it clear that we alcoholics suffer from a disease which only a spiritual experience can conquer.”

Several group members met with the Indy Intergroup and We Agnostics was re-listed. They agreed that an adapted version of the 12 Steps would not be read at their meetings. In fact the We Agnostics “group conscience” was that literature that was not “Conference-approved” would not be included in the meeting format.

Nevertheless, the group was officially booted out a second time on May 8, 2011. This time no reason was given. Group members were not contacted. They were not told in advance that the issue was on the Intergroup agenda. They were not told of the allegations against them. They were not provided with an opportunity to offer any kind of defence. They were not even informed of the decision by Intergroup to de-list them but learned of it afterwards from a third party, accidentally.

An article in the July issue of the Indianapolis Intergroup, Inc. newsletter, The Paper, boasted that “Indy AA remains undiluted” as a consequence of the expulsion of We Agnostics.

“Nothing in the committee’s decision in any way attempts to exclude or limit anyone from AA membership, so long as he/she has the requisite desire to stop drinking” the article goes on to say, suggesting that it’s not acceptable to exclude an individual but it’s okay to boot groups of nonbelievers – such as We Agnostics – out of AA.

The Indy Intergroup clearly made an effort to present both sides of the debate around the de-listing of this group, or perhaps even any group. In the August issue of The Paper there is a lengthy article entitled, “The Other Side of the Story – Expelling a Local Group”. In that article Donna H takes great exception with the expulsion of We Agnostics:

Quote:
“Simply, the Service Committee has greatly over-reached its boundaries (they are trusted servants, they do not govern) and have completely ignored at least six of our Traditions”.
She goes on to say:

Quote:
There was neither respect nor careful consideration; neither trust nor love. Personalities were everywhere and sadly not one Service Committee member asked themselves if there “might be another way to deal with this” or “maybe we should consult the traditions” or even “let’s decide not to decide tonight”. Instead there was a pound on the table, the decision made (not voted on mind you) and the meeting was ended.
Virginia R, the AA area delegate for southern Indiana reported: “The committee’s action caused all sorts of collateral damage. Long-time friendships were affected and there was a general sense of simmering hostility from all corners of our local AA community”.

Faced with a backlash, the Intergroup Service Committee met again on Thursday, October 6, and voted to re-list We Agnostics.

The de facto lawyer for the Service Group and the author of the article “Indy AA remains undiluted” in the July issue of the Indianapolis Intergroup newsletter, Stephen U, argued on Saturday, October 8, that the vote to re-list We Agnostics was “null and void”.

A day later, on Sunday, October 9, a general membership meeting of the Indianapolis Intergroup was held. At that meeting representatives of AA groups in Indianapolis expressed their lack of confidence in the Service Committee and voted (“something like 112-72”, according to Donna) against the decision to de-list We Agnostics. The following Thursday, October 13, 2011, the Service Committee met in a special meeting and voted for a second time, to re-list We Agnostics.

Notice must have been provided this time, because the very next day – more than six months after having been de-listed – We Agnostics was back on the meeting list on Intergroup’s website.

At the time, Joe, who is the first to acknowledge that his own behaviour was not always impeccable, said that he was exhausted as a result of the controversy. The area delegate, Virginia, reported that, “The whole ordeal was physically, emotionally and mentally exhausting. Glad to be done with it.”

Now according to Joe, the Service Committee took the position that “if anyone complains about a meeting, they will be told to go to another meeting.”
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Old 9th June 2017, 01:00 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Case 5: Denver Freethinkers in AA Group

The first secular meeting of Freethinkers in AA in Denver, Colorado was held on October 2, 2013, with eight people in attendance. Two weeks later, there were 12 members, several of whom had stopped attending the religious meetings years ago.

After several months of the meetings attracting 15 to 20 members, it became clear that the group needed to expand to weekly meetings and to consider adding a second meeting. So, in July 2014, the Freethinkers in AA Group became a weekly Monday 6:30 PM meeting and a Saturday 9:30 AM meeting.

The group – its listing never yet having been approved – again contacted the Denver Central Office Manager to request a print and online listing of these group meetings, which were duly registered with the General Service Office in New York. The manager flatly refused the listing, saying “We wouldn’t want a newcomer to attend your meeting and think it is representative of what AA really is”. She later sent out people to visit the group and report back. When she was sent the name of the group’s Intergroup Representative, the Denver Central Office Manager responded that the Freethinkers in AA Group “cannot have representation on the Central Office Committee” since it is “not a recognized group”.

One of the main founders of the group, Jeb B, expressed his frustration this way:
Quote:
I find it incredibly unfortunate that 12-Step programs and treatment programs recommending them cannot let go of the religious origins and practices like prayer to an imaginary being. No one seeking recovery should be required to participate in religious practices, prayers, of any kind. Such programs are missing the boat by failing to utilize the proven cognitive-behavioural process constituting the true 12-Step program.
Spiritual make believe has no place in government programs of our constitutional secular society.
Freethinkers in AA continues to thrive, and has 140 men and women on its confidential group list. The group makes quarterly contributions to AA World Services and District 9 and Area 10 of AA. Its next outreach effort will be to contact all area treatment facilities with information about the group and its meetings.
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Old 9th June 2017, 01:01 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Case 6: Laytonville Freethinkers Group

It took three years after a meeting had been started for it to be listed. In April 2013 Life-J approached the Mendocino Inland Intergroup to get a meeting he and a few others were planning, the Laytonville Freethinkers Group, listed in the local meeting directory. A couple of people objected and they rallied their forces against the group. The fight kept on until February 2014 when Life-J finally gave up trying to have it included in the meeting list.

The group went ahead and held the first Laytonville Freethinkers meeting on August 22, 2013. It was one of five AA meetings in Laytonville, which has a population of less than 1,500. And it wouldn’t be listed until October 2016.

It was in that month in 2016 that the AA Grapevine published an issue devoted to “Atheist and Agnostic Members” of AA. There were half a dozen articles in that issue written by atheists and one of the best was called Open-Minded. It was written by Life-J and in it he discussed his problem getting his meeting listed in “liberal Northern California”.

Well, that article got read at meetings in Laytonville and at other meetings in the area and the next time the Mendocino Inland Intergroup met it was decided to include the Laytonville Freethinkers meeting in the meeting directory. The process took three years.
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Old 9th June 2017, 01:02 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Case 7: Vancouver We Agnostics and Sober Agnostics Groups

The groups were not only originally accepted but they were welcomed. The person at Central Office said “Fantastic! It’s time we had one of these meetings in Vancouver”, and then a short time later that individual was let go or fired and then the meetings were stricken from the list.

One of the key players in starting agnostic meetings in Vancouver was a fellow by the name of Denis Kilborn. His sobriety date was April 28, 1975 and he died from cancer complications on April 1, 2016. As Dan V put it, “In his 41 years in AA he helped countless numbers of people, as a sponsor and as a friend. AA was his life… Denis was not only my sponsor for 32 years but also my trusted friend.”
Denis started the first agnostic AA meeting in the city of Vancouver.

Denis chose to do that, as he put, rather than “silently suffer the dogma and the rituals that had taken over many of the local meetings. Things like ending the meetings by holding hands and then the chair calls out ‘Who’s the boss?’ and everyone recites the Lord’s Prayer.”

It was a men’s meeting called “We Agnostics” and was held on Monday nights. The meeting was duly registered with both the New York GSO and the Greater Vancouver Intergroup Society in the summer of 2012.

A year later Denis helped start another meeting, this one called “Sober Agnostics”. Its founding meeting was held on May 7, 2013 and the meeting is still going strong today. Indeed, an updated “How It Works”, put together by one of its members Hilary J and adopted by the group, can be found in Appendix I: Secular Versions of “How It Works”.
This meeting too was registered with the General Service Office in New York and with the Vancouver Intergroup.

However, problems were on their way. As Hilary reports:

Quote:
Our meeting soon attracted the attention of the Vancouver Intergroup operating committee. The committee chair, Jim J., attended incognito to “see what we were up to”, announcing himself at the end of the meeting. When the next edition of the directory was published, Sober Agnostics had been deleted.

This precipitated lengthy, sometimes hostile debates at the monthly Intergroup meetings.

Since we had changed the Steps, and did not use the official AA literature, were we really an AA group? Did the operating committee have the authority to decide whether we should be listed? A package was issued to all Intergroup reps to take back to their home groups for group conscience. After months of agonizing debate and delays, the final vote was on whether Intergroup should continue to discuss the matter. The verdict was “No”, and that was the end of that.
The problem wouldn’t be resolved for almost four years. The last time the agnostic groups had been listed in the GVIS meeting directory was in June of 2013.

In 2017 it was finally decided to reopen the issue and to have an actual vote on whether or not these groups should be listed and not leave that decision solely to the Intergroup operating committee. The vote took place on March 21, 2017. There were some 50 people present and there was a long and difficult discussion. A two-thirds majority – 31 votes – was required in order to list the secular groups and re-admit them as voting members of the Greater Vancouver Intergroup Society.

Thirty-three people voted to “list all groups that wish to be listed”.
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Old 9th June 2017, 01:03 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Case 8: Kingston, Ontario

The Broader Path group was “de-listed” by District 36 (Kingston & The Islands) in 2015. The reason given was that the group labelled itself as “secular spiritual”.

De-listing would have removed the Broader Path meeting from the District 36 website, telephone answering service and meeting lists. The motion would also have deprived this GSO-registered AA group of all rights to participate in the Alcoholics Anonymous general service structure.
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Old 9th June 2017, 01:14 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Case 9: Quad A Canberra, Australia

Quad A Canberra was named after the first non-religious AA meeting (Quad A in Chicago).

It was officially opened on 7 June 2016. Wor Chemecs and Chuck F co-founded the meeting. The meeting was listed by the local area administration (Group B) on their website the same day.

It took 4 applications and three months for the meeting to be listed by the National Office of AA.

The meeting is still running being attended by 8-10 people per week.

It celebrates its first birthday today.
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Old 9th June 2017, 06:02 PM
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Default Re: A Short and Incomplete History of Harassment of Agnostics/Atheists in AA

Fantastic post(s) workmx. Quite a case you've compiled against a truly insipid religiosity, as usual, exploiting people in a time of need.
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