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Thread: Live Near the Beach?

  1. #1
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    Default Live Near the Beach?

    This belongs here.

    Veron predicts 15 years.

    The Age
    Tim Elliot
    I hour ago

    Live near the beach? Coral reef expert Charlie Veron has some advice for you

    http://www.msn.com/en-au/news/austra...cid=spartandhp
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Live Near the Beach?

    What a great article, perfect Sunday morning reading, besides of course how depressing it was.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Live Near the Beach?

    Indeed pip.

    Veron's mate the excellent Dr.Tim Flannery, scientist and science communicator would be fully cognisant of how and why Veron has acquired this fatalistic, apocalyptic outlook he is sure is soon to be visited upon us.

    But Tim is your true indomitable optimist. He says we will be making plastic from atmospheric CO2.

    We are committed to industrialisation, energy, computerised systems. It's not like the gradual transitions to this contemporary order of things as transpired under the Agricultural and then the Industrial Revolutions, although the working masses suffered losing their subsistent way of life. We can't simply fall back to horse and cart and village markets, once the coastal cities, refineries and houses are submerged. Population has exploded. We totally rely on fossil fuel fertiliser, diesel and computerised logistics for the food to get there in the supermarket.

    Veron predicts war for resources. What assurance is there that contention for such claims and defence of them wouldn't go nuclear? Russia has a supreme fleet of modern ice-breakers to dominate huge Arctic fossil fuel deposits as they become accessible.

    I presume Flannery remains positive or believes he should maintain that mien, in the face of the unconscionable approval for Indian conglomerate Adani to exploit Carmichael, the Galilee Basin. Now we have the states contemplating going their own way with regards to Australia's commitment to the Paris Agreement, the Trump regime spurning that Agreement and going full on for exploitation, abolishing environmental protections.

    I hope Scott Ludlam remains influential.

    Galilee Basin statistics from ABC News.

    The Galilee Basin is 247,000 square kilometres in size.

    The proposed mining projects within the basin have the potential to attract investment of between $3.8 and $4.8 billion and could provide about 1,200 jobs per year.

    Prices of thermal coal have dropped in recent years from a high of nearly $142 ($US per tonne) in early 2011, to about $62.

    Greenpeace estimates if the Galilee Basin mines are developed to their maximum potential, 705 million tonnes of CO2 would be released each year.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-1...nsland/6328514
    Last edited by Strato; 16th July 2017 at 09:29 PM.
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Live Near the Beach?

    It's hard to share Flannery' optimism in 3rd way tech when we have people like Abbott and one nation with legislative power, let alone the great orange idiot. I reckon we're probably fucked to some degree, it's just a matter of trying to avoid worst possible outcomes. As for the reef...my glass is half full. Off to the wine cellar...

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  6. #5
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    Default Re: Live Near the Beach?

    With the focus going away from manufacturing, and more into service industries, cyber security is becoming a major issue.

    Take solar vs the push to re-establish coal. A terrorist has to go around hacking every damn household and small business with solar panels. Or a great big fucking coal, or oil or nuc station can be hacked [because it is on a grid] or blown up.
    Granted, most solar systems are connected to the grid, but they don't have to be, at least not all the time.

    So big, complex interconnected and environmentally unfriendly power systems are vulnerable and dangerous in multiple ways.

    Even the Australian defence force is realising it doesn't matter how many big shiny toys you have [whether they be power stations of tanks] if someone hacks your control system you are totally fucked. And you have global warming, pollution, habitat destruction , etc, etc.

    For too many years we have been complacent as a client state, taking responsibility for nothing. We sold wheat and sheep and iron ore and shit and actually produced sweet fuck all. Too hard, not profitable enough. Why bother?

    OK, most of the world's patents are owned by the US, but that is just a complication, not a barrier. So the vast majority of solar panels on our roofs are German or Chinese or whatever.

    We never really suffered hard, with the exception of the indigenous portion of our population. Yeah, there was the bombing of Darwin and shit like that, but nothing like what Germany suffered in the 20th century, or China for that matter.

    So we play our footy and drink our beer [and yes, there is nothing wrong with that], but we vote in politicians who don't see the future, or care about it. Because few really understand what our wealth is based on, and how it can all unravel.

    So we were sold "cheap" defence by Britain and the USA, which was nether cheap in lives, or really secure [Australia would have sufferred if the Cuban missile crises had gone to shit, just as much as the USA would have- US bases in OZ].

    General Motors [USA] was "sold as" Holden, an "Australian" car!

    We were suckers. Thinking ourselves independent while all the while a client state. We could not even get a republic going. So our policy has been one of something between an atavistic holding onto apron strings and Stockholm Syndrome.

    This "national state of mind" affected our society and our economy in fundamental ways. We were far more aggressive and involved in the battle field than we needed to be, and yet timid and compliant in economics and trade [and ironically, with a bit of racism thrown in for flavour]. Australian innovators were rewarded by going overseas and becoming citizens of St. Elsewhere, never Australia.

    By letting multinational corporations walk all over us, we caused the import of militant unions, which although they acted [and rightly so] as a foil for the more fascistic corporations, also helped build a climate that became toxic to true and fair partnerships between business, labour and government, for the benefit of all.

    Just stick to the idea that science tests falsifiable hypotheses to destruction.

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