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Thread: Fake News - proper etiquette?

  1. #1
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    Default Fake News - proper etiquette?

    Back in the days before facebook was such a big deal, my best friend used to forward every fake news email to his entire contact list. Because that was what they told him he had to do: "forward this to everyone on your contact list".

    I used to love to hit "Reply All" and send him a Snopes link (there are others now, such as hoaxslayer) or some other research that I'd done showing that it was bollocks.

    Eventually he would just forward every chain email to me alone and ask me to "check" the story first. I felt like I'd done some good, training one gullible person to be at least a little skeptical.

    Now I see fake news all the time on Facebook and it really gets under my skin. A couple of times I've included a link debunking the fake news in the comments, but I worry that I'm going to end up with no redneck friends left if I keep doing that.

    Last night I sent someone a polite private message and suggested that they might like to delete a particular anti-Islam fake news story they had shared. She thanked me, but also said it was a shame that it was fake?

    Does anyone else notice this kind of thing, and what do you do about it?

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    Quote 142857 said View Post

    Does anyone else notice this kind of thing, and what do you do about it?
    I get in to a lot of arguments.
    .
    .
    .


    The Nizkor Project- Logical Fallacies

    Atheist: n; A person to be pitied in that he is unable to believe things for which there is no evidence, and who has thus deprived himself of a convenient means of feeling superior to others.
    —Chaz Bufe, The American Heretic’s Dictionary

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  5. #3
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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    Yeah I have done it a few times. My favorite was to a old friend. He shared some fake news article (mis)quoting some scientists study with no link to the study.

    So I apologized, directed my ire at the newspaper, not him, and posted a link to the full text of the actual study and another to the comments from the lead scientist who was (mis)quoted, in turn having a go at the misquoting going around. The response I got was "did you think I really wanted to know that?" lol. My thought was "did you think I really wanted to read fake news". It seems I incorrectly assumed another atheist wouldn't like being taken for a ride even if the story suited them.. guess I was wrong... sigh...
    Last edited by joele; 13th July 2017 at 12:02 AM.
    "Faith: not wanting to know what is true" - Nietzsche

    “Religion the protector of the well fed and consoler of the hungry.” - Mikhail Bakunin

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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    It's the social media etiquette rather than fake news etiquette, I suspect. It took me a long time to realise that many (most?) people on FB don't want anything but likes or favourable comments on their posts, and get quite annoyed with disagreement. I still get this wrong. I tried reposting fake news and related things on to my page and rebutting them there but that seems to upset people as well.


    The humans, huh? I'm still learning to live with them.
    WAS2018

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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    Quote wearestardust said View Post
    It's the social media etiquette rather than fake news etiquette, I suspect. It took me a long time to realise that many (most?) people on FB don't want anything but likes or favourable comments on their posts, and get quite annoyed with disagreement. I still get this wrong. I tried reposting fake news and related things on to my page and rebutting them there but that seems to upset people as well.


    The humans, huh? I'm still learning to live with them.
    We are apes in clothes. Fortunately our digestive tracts do not require intelligence to continue to function
    "I'm an ape, I'm an African ape and I'm proud of it, and you should be too". Richard Dawkins

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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    I have a cousin who shares all the "natural cures", usually I just paste a link to Snopes or a real article. I'm still amazed she never learns.
    “The figures looked more or less human. And they were engaged in religion. You could tell by the knives (it's not murder if you do it for a god).”
    ― Terry Pratchett, Small Gods

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  11. #7
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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    A sudden email influx of reposted facebook would-be-funny racist raves from a relative was an early warning for me.

    The poor blighter was descending into dementia. Unfortunately there was nothing I could do, and the old fellow was on the other side of the religious divide in my family (in this corner, Goat - in the other, all Gawd's sheeps!) so I was forced to cut off contact.

    Relative or not, I won't accept that rubbish from anybody.
    EJB

    I’m not one of the dead ones yet. - Ms Fishie.


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  13. #8
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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    Quote The Irreverent Mr Black said View Post

    Relative or not, I won't accept that rubbish from anybody.
    I agree. If people get upset with me on social media, let them block me. I really don't care.

    Sometimes it's a problem if it's something visible to my partner's friends and I'm scaring them away from her. In those cases I hold back.

    Facebook is addictive and often useful, but I also hate the way it commercialises private communication, eats up leisure time and dumbs down discourse.

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  15. #9
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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    Quote wolty said View Post
    Quote 142857 said View Post

    Does anyone else notice this kind of thing, and what do you do about it?
    I get in to a lot of arguments.
    You'd think I would, too, right?

    Strangely, most of my friends list don't try to argue with me.
    -Geoff Rogers

    @Goldenmane3


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  17. #10
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    Default Re: Fake News - proper etiquette?

    Quote joele said View Post
    Yeah I have done it a few times. My favorite was to a old friend. He shared some fake news article (mis)quoting some scientists study with no link to the study.

    So I apologized, directed my ire at the newspaper, not him, and posted a link to the full text of the actual study and another to the comments from the lead scientist who was (mis)quoted, in turn having a go at the misquoting going around. The response I got was "did you think I really wanted to know that?" lol. My thought was "did you think I really wanted to read fake news". It seems I incorrectly assumed another atheist wouldn't like being taken for a ride even if the story suited them.. guess I was wrong... sigh...
    This is what I worry about, pissing people off and making them more dogged in their misguided beliefs. I'd rather keep the lines of communication open, encourage them to question what they read and hear, and try to be a positive influence.

    The friend I sent a private message to a couple of days ago about a fake news story that she had shared messaged me back to thank me and tell me that she'd deleted it. I gave her a few hints about how to spot a likely fake news story but she said that she'd stick to just sharing jokes in future.

    I'm going to keep up this approach for a while and see how it goes.

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