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Thread: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

  1. #1
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    Default Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    I saw the title referenced somewhere and knew I needed to prioritise it.

    I had read [I]Sapiens.[/]

    'Dr. Yuval Noah Harari has a PhD in History from the University of Oxford and now lectures at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem specialising in World History. Sapiens: a Brief History of Humankind, published in 2014, has become an international phenomenon and is published in nearly 40 languages worldwide. It was on the Sunday Times bestseller list for over 6 months in paperback and was a New York Times bestseller.'

    Homo Deus (2016) is profound. Humans are data and algorithm processors. Intelligence and indeed consciousness is algorithmic, merely. There is no self.

    We will soon become redundant in this the Third Millennium, supplanted by AI. The wealthiest elites will be able to afford the ongoing upgrades but they too won't be able to match artificial intelligence, inevitably.

    Humanism, creativity, ethics, atheism, democracy, liberalism, psychology, anthropology, phenomenology - all becomes of no account in the universe of Dataism. That dystopian vision of things to come is unstoppable, it seems.

    I have decided I must carry on as though I hadn't read it. If that were possible.

    Were you to read it also my esteemed friends, I feel sure this thread will generate much edifying comment.

    I will give it a few weeks before I read the book over again, plodder that I am.
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    I think at some point humans will start rejecting too much technology, simply because it is dehumanising. I already have a love/hate relationship with it and have a fantasy of turning hippie and throwing out my computer and phone but society makes it virtually impossible to live in this world without it.
    Cars are the same. I know a few people that don't drive and they have great difficulty getting to the various worksites around western Sydney. I'd love to live in an area where I could give up my vehicle (I'd keep my motorbike though, for fun ).
    “It's not my responsibility to be beautiful. I'm not alive for that purpose. My existence is not about how desirable you find me.” ― Warsan shire
    “Human beings have rights and are entitled to respect. Ideas, books, and beliefs don’t, and aren’t.” ― Ali A Rizvi

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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    I look forward to reading that Strato, thanks for the heads up. Its not out in paper book for a couple weeks though.

    I'm the same KP. Technology is a little bit evil but i also love it. I'm doing all i can to work out how to drop out and go bush. I've spent the summer so far refining my wine making skills (priorities are important) and researching fruit trees, for the aforementioned purpose...oh, and for food too.

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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    Quote pipbarber said View Post
    I look forward to reading that Strato, thanks for the heads up. Its not out in paper book for a couple weeks though.

    I'm the same KP. Technology is a little bit evil but i also love it. I'm doing all i can to work out how to drop out and go bush. I've spent the summer so far refining my wine making skills (priorities are important) and researching fruit trees, for the aforementioned purpose...oh, and for food too.
    Me too. Minimalism and self sufficiency are becoming popular and kinda go hand in hand with reducing our reliance on tech. A little technology is good, but let's not let it rule our lives.
    “It's not my responsibility to be beautiful. I'm not alive for that purpose. My existence is not about how desirable you find me.” ― Warsan shire
    “Human beings have rights and are entitled to respect. Ideas, books, and beliefs don’t, and aren’t.” ― Ali A Rizvi

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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    I got it in paperback from The Book Dspository online. It took a few days to be in the letterbox, $23. I don't see how the technocracy can be reigned in.

    Homo Deus will be the paradigm through which I think about the world now and that to come, upon us.

    It will certainly be interesting to see what Harari says after this. I realise this is hyperbole but he is like a prophet. I don't follow wise ones.
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    Sitting on the bank of the Barwon river watching the private schools' girls' rowing heats. Private schools, everybody cheering for their school's crew.

    These are the people who will be able to afford the necessary upgrades technology delivers, driven by research, driven by money and the advantage for those who can get it.

    It is it is. What will be will be. Homo Deus is profound.
    Last edited by Strato; 19th March 2017 at 02:51 PM.
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    Quote Strato said View Post
    Sitting on the bank of the Barwon river watching the private schools' girls' rowing heats. Private schools, everybody cheering for their school's crew.

    These are the people who will be able to afford the necessary upgrades technology delivers, driven by research, driven by money and the advantage for those who can get it.

    It is it is. What will be will be. Homo Deus is profound.
    Immortality's overrated. Ask Tithonus (backstory)
    EJB

    I’m not one of the dead ones yet. - Ms Fishie.


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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    How would you like the body you had in your early 20s back again, with tissue regeneration, indeed, aging no more, or a lifespan of 500 years, with stupendous data access and processing capabilities, godlike apprehension of physical reality and of intersubjectivity. Lord Tennyson might even nominate for it.

    There are plenty who would give anything for that, such as billionaires. The technology is coming. When do we say, enough technology, enough medical over-mastering of the Grim Reaper? Medicine is about defeating death.

    Driverless cars will soon enough supplant human operated cars. They will never prang. If one senses a human looking like they are about to step out on the road, from instantly processing body language and facial algorithms, and it brakes, the car/s behind won't react. They will receive the same command to brake simultaneously from the central computer regulating all traffic. Human driven cars will be banned. Uber will take over all transportation.

    All this not without a fight. The Uber transportation future will use a fraction of the energy cars currently do worldwide.

    If I was 88 and chronically tired I would still have to read it or get the audio book. My dad at that age would say to me, 'ah, well, it won't happen in my lifetime,' meaning I'm not interested. It won't affect me. End of convo. I did find that contemptible, just quietly.
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    Quote Strato said View Post
    How would you like the body you had in your early 20s back again, with tissue regeneration, indeed, aging no more, or a lifespan of 500 years, with stupendous data access and processing capabilities, godlike apprehension of physical reality and of intersubjectivity. Lord Tennyson might even nominate for it.
    No, I'm satisfied I've seen nearly enough, and there's always the chance I'm going to outlive a viable climate, even with my current limited expectancy.
    EJB

    I’m not one of the dead ones yet. - Ms Fishie.


  12. #10
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    Default Re: Homo Deus: A brief History of Tomorrow

    The scenario doesn't attract me either Mr. Black. Being one of the elites, Homo Deus.

    If the full dystopian vision comes to pass, vegetation will still be useful to prevent the planet from becoming a sandstorm, torrents of mud washing away. Animals won't be necessary, not even humans in the Brave New World of cybernetics and super algorithms.

    Still, announcements of breakthroughs in medical technology, such as cancer treatments are the good news amongst all the stories vying to concern the public.

    We will beat cancer. Multitudes run in great marathon events held for funding cancer research. This is for the common good, or at least the medicine developed gets cheaper over time so all might access it. Wonderful.

    I try not to burden my 15 year old daughter. She says she found genetics in science exciting.

    What will be by 2100 and beyond, will be.
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

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