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Thread: Theistic inclinations

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Theistic inclinations

    Quote 142857 said View Post
    My takeaway from what Cox said was that it appears likely that simple, single-celled life is very common, as it arose on Earth pretty much as early as it was possible for it to arise.

    Multi-celled life, on the other hand, may have taken billions of years more to develop and appears to have only happened once. Whatever caused it to happen seems to have been an extreme long-shot.

    Further, he quoted another scientist who had guesstimated that a technologically advanced civilization around ten million years to progress to starhopping and making a significant footprint on their section of the galaxy.

    The fact that we have yet to detect such a civilization may indicate that such civilizations are exceedingly rare. We may even be alone in this galaxy as a technologically advanced civilization.


    I really like the way you said that we are story-telling apes, and that the stories we are uncovering are far more interesting than anything we could have made up. I think the idea that I descended from a fish is far more interesting and exciting than the idea that a sky wizard made me in his own image.
    But bacteria are already colonial, and many have some of the mutations necessary for more complex multicellular life. Some already have inter-cellular signalling and adhesion adaptations, and those are not such a big deal. neither is the innovation of [eukaryotic type] sex. And since you can get a good fitness boost [in many scenarios] for a neural net, I don't see that as a problem either. Once you actually have a bacterial grade organism, it is actually quite east from there.

    Multicellularity [and complex multicelluarity] is actually a great way of avoiding predation, or becoming a predator yourself. You become too big to eat!

    I think complex multicellular life is not only likely, but inevitable. It is just too easy for life to evolve, especially in such a vast universe. The growing complexity and diversity of physical conditions makes many places suitable for life to evolve. We are talking about billions of Earth-like planets, and that is just for life as we know it. There may be other ways for life to evolve that we don't know about, perhaps life based on ammonia as the solvent, instead of water. But we know that the same elements and compounds and conditions that promote life here must be fairly common throughout the universe.
    Just stick to the idea that science tests falsifiable hypotheses to destruction.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Theistic inclinations

    Quote Azurisan21 said View Post
    Hello all,

    I would like to inform all that I have theistic inclinations. When I apply rationalism, I am clearly an atheist. When I let go of rationalism and let my emotions run, I feel lightened up with thoughts about god.

    ...
    I often feel the same when I'm walking the dogs, though I'm 'lightened up' by what's around me - by the glories of the natural world rather than the imagined glory of a mythological fiction. I personally think those kinds of good feelings about the natural environment are, well, natural - religions, in ascribing agency to natural phenomena, just tell you that they're down to their nominated deity rather than down to you and the environment.
    Last edited by THWOTH; 25th February 2017 at 09:20 PM. Reason: Phone spelt things bag
    ...never eat your own nose...

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Theistic inclinations

    Quote THWOTH said View Post
    I often feel the same when I'm walking the dogs, though I'm 'lightened up' by what's around me - by the glories of the natural world rather than the imagined glory of a mythological fiction. I personally think those kinds of good feelings about the natural environment are, well, natural - religions, in ascribing agency to natural phenomena, just tell you that they're down to their nominated deity rather than down to you and the environment.
    You have never taken this puppy for a walk!

    Just stick to the idea that science tests falsifiable hypotheses to destruction.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Theistic inclinations

    Lolz. Yes I have. Not much time to consider the lilies when the little blighter doesn't know its own name and just wants to run in all directions at once.
    ...never eat your own nose...

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Theistic inclinations

    Imagination is great. I play Dungeons and Dragons and other table top role playing games all the time.

    But what really gets me going is science and philosophy.

    Understanding how a neuron works or how ice crystals form is so much more interesting than ideas of some god thingy.

    Understanding the logical fallacies or the need to disrupt our current perceptions to free our thinking is so much more nourishing to my mind and happiness than any fantasy about the supernatural.
    "History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people maintaining a free civil government".
    -Thomas Jefferson

    Burden of proof is the obligation on somebody presenting a claim to provide evidence to support its truth (a warrant). Once evidence has been presented, it is up to any opposing "side" to show the evidence presented is not adequate. If claims were accepted without warrants, then every claim could simultaneously be claimed to be true.

    History isn't written by the victors. It's written by the people with the time machines.

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