Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,788

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Quote pipbarber said View Post
    Quote wadaye said View Post
    The other option of course is to claim protection on grounds of religious persecution, persection because of the religion of the persecutprs and lack of belief on your part
    Easier said than done i think wadaye. Generally you have to have actually been persecuted (imprisoned etc) prior to making a claim. Without that there would be an almost impossible burden of proof. However, i'm sure it varies from country to country. These people may have better info

    https://secularpolicyinstitute.net/p...sylum-program/
    Hi Pip past persecution may indicate a likelihood of future persecution but is not a guarantee of it. The absence of past persecution is not indicative of the absence of a real risk or well founded fear of persecution.
    The test is a future looking test.

    You can check out the refugees convention or unhcr for guidelines
    "I'm an ape, I'm an African ape and I'm proud of it, and you should be too". Richard Dawkins

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,129

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Quote wadaye said View Post
    Hi Pip past persecution may indicate a likelihood of future persecution but is not a guarantee of it. The absence of past persecution is not indicative of the absence of a real risk or well founded fear of persecution.
    The test is a future looking test.

    You can check out the refugees convention or unhcr for guidelines
    From your understanding is there more likelihood of success for an asylum seeker that has already experienced persecution on some level than those that havent? Is there data for that i wonder?

    It's kind of sad if thats the case but somehow its also reasonable on some level too. Difficult.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    I live in hope.
    Posts
    5,935

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Hi Life Lover,

    There is the possibility of applying for refugee status on the grounds of your atheism and the consequences for you if that is found out. You also have your degree obtained in the USA.

    You would have to be able to prove your atheism is genuine, on evidence. How do you provide that? Your opening post here as evidence of your position regarding religion and your intellectual journey to this, could not be construed as some kind of a ruse.

    However, undertaking that could be risky.
    Wars begin in the minds of men.
    The UNESCO motto, in Enlightenment Now, the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress, Steven Pinker, 2018.

  4. #14

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Thanks everyone for your nice words and encouragement.

    I honestly don't know of the chances I would have if I try to seek asylum in a free country given the fact I have lived in Saudi for several years and was never personally persecuted (since no one knows about my atheism). But there are several cases of atheists getting detained for long years after someone finds out about them.

    Strato,
    You are right. The world is becoming more hostile toward Middle Eastern immigrants. For the past several years, I spend most of my holidays and vacations in Europe (since most parts of Europe are only 5-6 hours flight from Saudi). In the years 2012-beg 2015, I was always treated well and everyone was smiling especially in touristic cities. However, since mid 2015, I noticed the difference in the people's attitude there toward me since I clearly look 100% Middle Eastern even in touristic cities (not everyone was rude, nor even the majority but the percentage sharply increased in the past 18 months)

    pipbarber,
    I personally don't know any atheist in Saudi Arabia. It is too risky even to say it to the ones you trust the most. Even giving hints or providing a very controversial opinion about religions is very risky. I traveled once with a colleague (who later became friend) to Dubai for the weekend. After having couple of drinks at a bar, he admitted to me he became an atheist two weeks before our meeting at the bar. At that moment I got scared, because sometimes the intelligence (secret police) tries to make people confess about their political opinions or religious affiliation.
    I then asked him why did he become atheist, he said because of all of the contradictions and violence in Islam. Then I asked him why are you telling this to me. He said: because you are one of the few persons I've who doesn't judge, which is a true feature of me. Then I told him that I am Muslim and I believe in God, then I told him not to tell anyone about his atheism for his safety. He then pegged me and said: please forget what I just told you and don't tell anyone. I said: don't worry about it, I will never tell anyone and what you just told won't have an impact on our relationship.
    At that time I was shaking and sweating, I was really afraid he was trying to make me confess since at work he has told once several months prior to our meeting at the bar "why don't we see you praying frequently in the prayer room in our department"!
    Hope this incident can explain to you how hard it would to talk about such a topic

  5. Like button DanDare, SEG liked this post
    Thank button pipbarber thanked this post
  6. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,788

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    That sounds to me like a well founded fear of persecution

    Sent from my SM-J105Y using Tapatalk
    "I'm an ape, I'm an African ape and I'm proud of it, and you should be too". Richard Dawkins

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    4,119

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Awesome post! Thanks!

  8. Like button DanDare liked this post
  9. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Hills District of Sydney
    Posts
    899

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Quote pipbarber said View Post
    Easier said than done i think wadaye. Generally you have to have actually been persecuted (imprisoned etc) prior to making a claim. Without that there would be an almost impossible burden of proof. However, i'm sure it varies from country to country. These people may have better info

    https://secularpolicyinstitute.net/p...sylum-program/
    That looks like a great resource for him and others in that situation Pinbarber, thanks for sharing. It is a reminder that education is so important and there are always people out there seeking to help others that are less fortunate.

  10. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Good on you,, to hell with Saudi Arabia's religious right, bunch of crazy wackos stuck in the past!

  11. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,129

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Quote Omar said View Post
    Good on you,, to hell with Saudi Arabia's religious right, bunch of crazy wackos stuck in the past!
    Yep, that pretty much sums it up for me!

  12. #20
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: The story of an ex-muslim, ex-christian guy from Saudi Arabia

    Wow Muslims do not believe they just pretend to believe

    That is my conclusion.

    They must think their religion is so fragile it has to be protected with violent responses.

    It is of course a sad situation for you.

    But you could have fun (cautious fun) watching their bravado, as they desperately try to live in our shrinking world (where their obsolete "beliefs" is a minority and are constantly being exposed as farcical by science and free thought).

    Not many ask the ambulance to drive past the emergency hospital and take them to a Mosque/church/ place of worship. So true believers are thin on the ground.
    God was a giant Queensland Blue Pumpkin. He was lonely and got bored so he blew himself up (aka the big bang) The pumpkin skin fragments became planets, the orange flesh vaporised into gasses and the seed fragments started life when conditions were right.

  13. Like button Life-Lover liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •