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Thread: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    I also had this discussion a few times over the weekend, I didn't much like the sexist jokes, but it was then pointed out that maybe I was taking him a bit too literally. For me the dead baby content was much more disgusting and distasteful. I didn't really find it funny or necessary once I put myself in the position of any audience member that had suffered such a loss.
    @Martin_madej I didn't know Jim or his work, after that I certainly won't be making any effort to see him again. I see a difference between going to a comedy show and going to an atheist convention, I didn't think he was particularly appropriate or funny, but that's just me, I'm sure plenty enjoyed as well. As said above the only common theme of atheism is god, so I can't imagine it would be possible to find a comedian who would please everyone, but for me Stella did a much better and more appropriate routine considering the event.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    Quote dilbadoon said View Post
    ... For me the dead baby content was much more disgusting and distasteful. I didn't really find it funny or necessary once I put myself in the position of any audience member that had suffered such a loss.
    ...
    I completely agree with you about the dead baby jokes. The fact he made a point of saying in a more serious tone that there may be members of the audience who have suffered the loss of a baby and then he went on to make more jokes didn't sit well with me.

    As I said earlier though, I was wiping away tears of laughter for most of his act. Many people do not think comedy should be censored and that it is up to each individual if they feel offended. I guess it comes down to whether his act was the type of comedy that was appropriate for the GAC.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    From the beginning of the joke I thought he was sending up the "blokey bloke" and when he got to the end I groaned aloud and took it as a very powerful punchline to what he was sending up.

    In no way did I think he actually meant it.


    I'm female btw.
    It's a very interesting thing, losing one's religion. It's like a revolution for one. --Jimmy Carr

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    Quote crocoduck said View Post
    From the beginning of the joke I thought he was sending up the "blokey bloke" and when he got to the end I groaned aloud and took it as a very powerful punchline to what he was sending up.

    In no way did I think he actually meant it.


    I'm female btw.
    That was more or less my take. except I'm a bloke.
    WAS2018

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    Quote dilbadoon said View Post
    For me the dead baby content was much more disgusting and distasteful. I didn't really find it funny or necessary once I put myself in the position of any audience member that had suffered such a loss.
    I agree that this made me far more uncomfortable than any other aspect of his performance. It would be very distressing were there someone in the audience who had suffered the loss of a child. As someone else has mentioned it was probably the fact that he addressed the issue that someone in the audience could have suffered such a loss and then turned it into a joke that made me feel uncomfortable (the fact that my occupation has brought me into contact with SIDS cases on a number of occasions probably makes this scenario even more real for me). The sexism issue is debatable and what his intentions are would be best known to himself. The dead babies was more clear cut.

    Overall I loved his performance. I laughed a lot. He made some very good points, and I find comedy a very effective tool to disarm religious belief. He is a very funny and clever man who definitely pushes the boundaries. Maybe a little too far at times for some.
    "Instead of being born again why don't you just grow up"


  6. #16
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    Quote crocoduck said View Post
    From the beginning of the joke I thought he was sending up the "blokey bloke" and when he got to the end I groaned aloud and took it as a very powerful punchline to what he was sending up.

    In no way did I think he actually meant it.


    I'm female btw.
    This was pretty much how it was explained to me, and it made sense. I often wonder why I regularly have trouble seeing humour like this for what it is, I tend to just take it at face value and literally until it is explained to me in that context.
    I guess that's why I like Jerry Seinfeld's standup, stupid jokes about everyday life!

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    I don't see how the statement could be called a joke, or any humour be found in it, unless you don't agree with it. Surely it's funny because it's so wrong. If you don't think it's wrong, it's just a statement of fact. It's like dead baby jokes - what do you get when you hit a dead baby with a hammer? An erection - etc. The humour is in the fact that they're such terrible things to say. People don't laugh because they agree, and indeed there would be nothing to laugh about if they agreed.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    Quote dilbadoon said View Post
    For me the dead baby content was much more disgusting and distasteful. I didn't really find it funny or necessary once I put myself in the position of any audience member that had suffered such a loss.
    Yup, was one of those audience members. I was a little shocked to say at first, but when I listened to the context about what he said I did not find it at all offensive. After all its satire anyway, and as Tom Ballard said on Saturday night, the best comedians attack real life (or something along those lines).

    It actually played on my mind a bit over the weekend to be honest. But it was more from the point of view that how can it be possible to assume that an innocent child is a sinner. That is the sick and twisted part.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Jim Jefferies cross the line?

    Quote owheelj said View Post
    I don't see how the statement could be called a joke, or any humour be found in it, unless you don't agree with it. Surely it's funny because it's so wrong. If you don't think it's wrong, it's just a statement of fact. It's like dead baby jokes - what do you get when you hit a dead baby with a hammer? An erection - etc. The humour is in the fact that they're such terrible things to say. People don't laugh because they agree, and indeed there would be nothing to laugh about if they agreed.

    +1

    The joke is in the shock value of just how wrong it is.

    I was shocked that Marion Maddox was shocked
    It's a very interesting thing, losing one's religion. It's like a revolution for one. --Jimmy Carr

  10. #20
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    What bothered me was the guy sitting in front of us who clapped waaaay too enthusiastically at the lack of respect for women joke. The danger of those types of jokes is that some nutters apparently take them seriously.


    i sent this from my iPad
    “The only position that leaves me with no cognitive dissonance is atheism. It is not a creed. Death is certain, replacing both the siren-song of Paradise and the dread of Hell. Life on this earth, with all its mystery and beauty and pain, is then to be lived far more intensely: we stumble and get up, we are sad, confident, insecure, feel loneliness and joy and love. There is nothing more; but I want nothing more.” -Christopher Hitchens

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